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IPS gearbox and clutch life?


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Hi all

I'm still very new to Evora's and am actively looking for a car at the moment. I'm generally focused on the colour and spec I want more than the gearbox and know that due to the limited production numbers I may need to compromise on something to help me find a car. I was all for needing a manual gearbox for driver involvement but I've seen a car that ticking all the boxes but it's an IPS box. I wondered if anyone could help me with a pros and cons list for the IPS box. What does it do really well, where is it not so good?

I've owned autos before and actually quite like the more relaxed driving in towns/traffic so I am definitely open to them. Also I heard that clutch life on manual Evora's is generally pretty good but when they go it's a big job to replace. Is the IPS a torque converter and is it known to failing and need replacing/repairing? Wondering if a benefit of an IPS might be not having to worry about costs due to clutch replacement.

Thanks

Trev

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IPS is a torque converter. It’s a Toyota part, have not heard of them breaking.

Early gearboxes and clutches sometimes had premature wear, and yes, replacement is a big job. But to my mind, a Lotus is naturally a compromise on daily driving anyway - getting in/out, visibility, etc. So I would choose a manual 10 times out of 10. If buying an involving car, I don’t see the point of taking away the one thing that makes driving interesting to me!

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Hi Trev,

I have become a new Lotus owner as of November. I had the same dilemma. I chose the IPS mainly because of clutch change costs. I hadn't even driven an Evora only sat in one. I bought the car from a dealer without ever seeing it or driving it!! I have had limited hours in the car due to weather, but I am madly in love with every thing about it. The IPS has two settings: standard auto and sport auto. In standard auto you can change gear using the paddles but it will reset to full auto after 30 seconds or so if no paddle is pressed. In sport auto it changes gear higher in the rev range and if you use the paddles it will then stay in flappy paddle mode. In sport it is amazing. The shifts are fast enough! As I have read else where you just get used to pulling the paddle once you see the first rev limiter light come on. On downshifts it blips the throttle, which sounds awesome and is very smile inducing.

It can be frustrating with it deciding to kick down if you are slightly heavy footed in standard auto, because it changes gear quite early. In traffic it is great, no heavy clutch leg and having only two peddles gives you loads of space to stretch your left leg out.

In my mind having the flappy paddles makes the car feel a bit more super car, but I am bias and having never driven one before it just feels right for the car. Mine is a sports racer and this car will never leave my possession! 

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I have a manual caterham and an IPS Evora, bought with head rather than heart. Clutch was one factor, road tax is the other. Road tax for the manual is almost £700 a year now! The IPS just squeezes into the lower bracket and is 395.

Despite my original reasons for buying it I love it. Regular Drive mode is sedate but in Sport it comes alive. 400 cars have a faster shift when using the paddles but I don't ever find it slow. Most magazine reviews were for early autos which had suspect software. Any car now will have been updated. My only real gripe is that it creeps too quickly with feet off the pedals in traffic but using the brake fixes that.

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  • Gold FFM

I've not driven the IPS but have had sporty torque converters before. It's a different experience. I like the ease of two peddle driving and it's good for left foot braking everywhere as you don't need to worry about the clutch. Which makes it always easy to balance the car and means slightly faster emergency stops. Lovely in traffic, unbeatable if you spend a lot of time at traffic lights and you don't have to constantly think 'that's more off the clutch'.

I did end up missing changing gear though and heel and toe. It's fun and fast but simple. I sort of want both depending on daily usage! Think it depends on your personal expectation of experience.

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