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JAWS

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JAWS last won the day on July 17 2022

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About JAWS

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    Jimbo
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    Lotus Evora

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Community Answers

  1. A lighter flywheel will definitely make it more free revving (but there are downsides). Do you have a free flow air filter like a K&N or an induction kit? This will give you slightly better throttle response.
  2. Based on your interior description of the car; it seems to be a legitimate Sports Racer. The 18/19" Forged wheels (albeit yours painted gold) were fitted to the Chinese Sport Racer and it is true some of these were changed to European spec. Yours being an IPS alludes to this. However, I notice that your calipers are marked "LOTUS" which leads me to believe it's not an "ex" Chinese car, unless these were changed as well as all the other badging (any more pics?) I suspect a previous owner or dealer "downsized" to those Forged variants. I'm intrigued.
  3. A little bit of trivia; the Chinese market Sports Racer actually used the 18/19" Forged Wheel but in black that was never offered as an option Once painted black and on the car, it was hard to notice the difference in size and slight design tweak of the two Forged Wheel offerings However, you're right (all other) Sports Racers came with 19/20" Forged Black wheels.
  4. A very amusing Freudian slip/spelling mistake there 😜
  5. This statement is totally incorrect, as others have implied. When the 'S' was launched, the 19/20" OPTION wheel was also launched. The standard wheel on the 'S' was the 18/19" cast wheel which was a no cost option to change to the Stealth Grey colour (a cost option on the N/A). As a point to note, most Evoras from that point onwards (N/A or 'S') were optioned up with the 19/20" wheel. For this reason most people associate them being an 'S' wheel, incorrectly.
  6. If you can work out which naca duct/part of the under tray it has come from will give you a good idea of whether it's engine or gearbox side. As Bruss says, get it cleaned up and check the area. I mention gearbox as it has a pressure release valve that can stiffen up over time and then "splat" a small amount of oil out. Coincidentally something you're seeing. However, that looks quite dirty oil (unless you've not changed the gearbox oil much?) So could be something else. If it is just that, a bit of WD40 on the valve and a check of the nylon transportation plug next to it should solve the problem or it's released itself anyway.
  7. @TrevS Out of interest is the puddle of oil on the left hand side of the engine? i.e the gearbox side and could it be gearbox oil? Also has the patch of oil grown or stil the same as when you first spotted it?
  8. Just a correction, the Evora used the info button stalk which is 1S7T13335BE so you would need to check which you have.
  9. It's actually from a MK1 Ford Focus 98-05. Possibly a MK3 Mondeo too. Check part number 98AG 13335 BE to verify. For future reference a Lotus 6000 series part number means it is a proprietary part.
  10. The part looks to have been marked up wrong by Janspeed. If anything it should be A132S0233F assuming it is a UK{ROW) part? A132S0253F is a Federal spec part. If people are interested the part numbers are broken down like this. The first letter being the engineering level. Any changes to it mean it goes up a level. A to B to C etc. The next 3 numbers refer to the model it was originally released on. 132 being Evora, 138 being Exige. The 4th letter relates to where the part is located on the car. 'S' being an exhaust component. The next 4 letters are randomly chosen unless it's a proprietary/"bought in part" which would use a 6000 series number, also the other rule is - LH/LHD should be an odd number, RH/RHD should be even (However, this rule was ignored a lot of times on the Tesla Roadster) The last letter relates to its status, 'F' being a finished part, 'S' a service part and so on.
  11. Well it was an Evora 400 change along with various "stiffening" of things and changes across the board, so would have been a consideration. I can't say that I've heard issues of Evora N/A or S "kangarooing". Personally I'd be replacing like for like. From memory (albeit near 10 years ago) changes to ancillary bits etc were made (exhaust hanger on the mount, fixing points?) For the 400 so you could be opening a can of worms and having to fabricate or change other components to possibly make them fit.
  12. In the owner's garage along with the trolley jack and breaker bar that come as part of the Evora Gulf state package 😆. It's a legal stipulation.
  13. You can actually get a spare wheel for the Evora. It's a legal requirement for Gulf state cars. It's the 19" front wheel/tyre which can be used on either the front or rear. You wouldn't be using it in anger though, just a get home job.
  14. Exactly that, trying to line up the weave over 3 body panels and ensuring panel gaps were exceptable would be impossible. That's why most large OEM's don't even use a centre line weave but a simple lay. Also where do you stop? I think the break using the black panels including the 'A' panels works. Personal taste I suppose. The hot climate markets had the carbon 'A' Panels and Cosmetic Roof panel but painted in black. As stated these carbon panels were actually heavier than the plastic standard parts.
  15. There were 2 variants due to the fact the demands on them are different based on weight and power of the models. The actual mounts would fit, it's the rubber bushing that differ and would provide a different feel. The later variants continue to be used on the Emira. Also, I haven't heard that the original parts are a "struggle" but understand that some will be pushing 14 years old and a "wear out" item. Comparing old (broken) against new rubbers whether you go for original spec or the later ones would be tricky to judge either way. They'll surely be an improvement?
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